Keyword: Arthritis

Andrea Clark

More than 4 million Canadians have arthritis and the number of people living with arthritis continues to increase year after year. Osteoarthritis involves multiple tissues and often includes cartilage damage, bone sclerosis and synovial inflammation. A pressing need remains for joint localized therapies and interventions that could slow or ideally stop this debilitating disease.
In our research, we use genetic and surgical models of spontaneous osteoarthritis (with old age) and post-traumatic osteoarthritis (following injury). We follow the progression of disease in a joint in order to better understand how proteins such as TRPV4, integrin alpha1beta1 and cilia influence chondrocyte signal transduction and thus the development of osteoarthritis.

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John Srbely

My interest in clinical biomechanics and neurophysiology evolved during my years as a primary health care provider in chiropractic and acupuncture. Over two decades of clinical observation underscored the fact that these, and other commonly adopted conservative clinical therapies/interventions, have a profound impact on human physiology, the scope and mechanisms of which are still poorly characterized. I began private practice in 1992 where I quickly developed a fascination for the clinical enigma of chronic musculoskeletal pain, the most common form of which being chronic myofascial pain.

My research program adopts a broad and integrative approach to the study of chronic musculoskeletal pain, incorporating both basic and clinical sciences. A major arm to my research program is investigat

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