Keyword: Barcoding and its applications

Sally Adamowicz

I have five major axes of research:
1) The Shape of the Tree of Life: I aim to understand the relationships amongst species and the factors that influence the shape of this tree.
2) Major Transitions in Evolution: I am interested in better understanding the frequency of transitions and the rate at which reversals occur, as well as the consequences of such transitions for molecular evolutionary patterns and speciation rates.
3) Evolutionary Trends: I am also interested in the question of whether there are large-scale patterns in the history of life.
4) The Diversity and Integrity of Freshwater Ecosystems: I approach this topic using molecular, ecological, and taxonomic methods to study the diversity, distributions, traits, and origins of species.
5) The Diversity of Polar Life: Using DNA barcoding, I aim to discover the true extent of arctic species diversity and to understand the geographical distributions and origins of arctic species.

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Ryan Gregory

My lab conducts research on the following themes:
1) Large-Scale Genome Evolution: We study the evolution of genomes at large. In particular, my primary topic of study in this regard are the "C-value enigma," transposable elements, and whole-genome duplications.
2) DNA Quantification Methodology: My lab is continuing to develop a new method of computerized image analysis for the measurement of nuclear DNA content.
3) Biological Diversity: We are interested in DNA-based methods for species identification and discovery, as well as general questions in evolutionary biology to understand how biological diversity arises at all levels.
4) Macroevolution and Multi-Level Selection Theory: We study genome size evolution to understand the operation of natural selection and other evolutionary principles at multiple levels.
5) Integrative Genomics and Evolutionary Biology: One of my primary interests is in integrating diverse and otherwise disconnected fields within the biological sciences. This includes not only making genome size and other data widely available to researchers in a range of disciplines, but also the creation of explicit partnerships between biologists in different fields.

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Elizabeth Mandeville

My research is motivated by quantifying variation in evolutionary and ecological processes that generate and maintain biodiversity. I study evolution in heterogeneous environments, over large geographic ranges, and in the presence of variable species assemblages by using computational approaches and bioinformatics techniques to analyze large, high-resolution genomic datasets. I focus on how evolutionary processes influence genomic variation in fish, how consistent the outcomes of these processes are, and how ecological traits of organisms and environmental attributes of rivers and lakes can affect the outcomes of evolutionary processes. Species are maintained as discrete genetic units by reproductive isolation between species, but species distinctiveness can also be countered by hybridization and introgression. Populations within a species experience analogous processes. Gene flow maintains similarity, but barriers to dispersal, genetic drift, and local adaptation promote differentiation. My work revolves around two focal questions: 1) How consistent are evolutionary and ecological outcomes of species interactions? and 2) To what extent are species evolutionarily cohesive across their ranges? Most of the fish species I study are affected by human-mediated disturbances, including species introductions and fragmentation of aquatic habitat by dams. I use large genomic, ecological, and isotopic datasets to understand how evolutionary processes function across ecological contexts.

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Steve Newmaster

My research explores biodiversity from different perspectives and scales. For example, we have been developing molecular diagnostic tools for plant identification, including herbal product authentication and certification within the food and natural product industry. We also actively contribute to the Plant Barcode of Life project and investigate the intra and interspecific variation in plastid and nuclear markers for plants. In addition, my research seeks to incorporate both Indigenous knowledge and DNA-based approaches to understanding diversity. At the ecosystem scale, I have extensively researched patterns of floristic diversity in forest ecosystems and studied the effects of ecosystem management on community structure. On top of this, I am engaged in the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) and have recently looked at 1) learning objects as mechanisms of engagement, 2) active learning within large first year biology classes, and 3) ancient pedagogies from some of the most remote cultures on the planet.

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Ryan Gregory

My lab conducts research on the following themes:
1) Large-Scale Genome Evolution: We study the evolution of genomes at large. In particular, my primary topic of study in this regard are the "C-value enigma," transposable elements, and whole-genome duplications.
2) DNA Quantification Methodology: My lab is continuing to develop a new method of computerized image analysis for the measurement of nuclear DNA content.
3) Biological Diversity: We are interested in DNA-based methods for species identification and discovery, as well as general questions in evolutionary biology to understand how biological diversity arises at all levels.
4) Macroevolution and Multi-Level Selection Theory: We study genome size evolution to understand the operation of natural selection and other evolutionary principles at multiple levels.
5) Integrative Genomics and Evolutionary Biology: One of my primary interests is in integrating diverse and otherwise disconnected fields within the biological sciences. This includes not only making genome size and other data widely available to researchers in a range of disciplines, but also the creation of explicit partnerships between biologists in different fields.

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Elizabeth Mandeville

My research is motivated by quantifying variation in evolutionary and ecological processes that generate and maintain biodiversity. I study evolution in heterogeneous environments, over large geographic ranges, and in the presence of variable species assemblages by using computational approaches and bioinformatics techniques to analyze large, high-resolution genomic datasets. I focus on how evolutionary processes influence genomic variation in fish, how consistent the outcomes of these processes are, and how ecological traits of organisms and environmental attributes of rivers and lakes can affect the outcomes of evolutionary processes. Species are maintained as discrete genetic units by reproductive isolation between species, but species distinctiveness can also be countered by hybridization and introgression. Populations within a species experience analogous processes. Gene flow maintains similarity, but barriers to dispersal, genetic drift, and local adaptation promote differentiation. My work revolves around two focal questions: 1) How consistent are evolutionary and ecological outcomes of species interactions? and 2) To what extent are species evolutionarily cohesive across their ranges? Most of the fish species I study are affected by human-mediated disturbances, including species introductions and fragmentation of aquatic habitat by dams. I use large genomic, ecological, and isotopic datasets to understand how evolutionary processes function across ecological contexts.

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