Keyword: Animal and plant conservation

Andrew Macdougall

Our main projects center on ecosystem services on Ontario farm landscapes, climate change in the Swedish High-arctic, and drivers of diversity decline in savannas of western North America

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Brian Husband

My research program investigates the ecological and evolutionary processes operating in plant populations, both wild and domesticated. Much of our work is conducted through the lens of plant reproductive systems, which control the quantity and quality of sperm and eggs, patterns of mating, and ultimately the transmission of genetic variation from one generation to the next. Current research projects include: 1) mating system variation and evolution, 2) polyploid speciation, 3) genetic and phenotypic consequences of whole genome duplication; 4) biology of small populations, and 5) impacts of hybridization between introduced species and endangered congeners. We work on a variety of study systems, including Arabidopsis, apple, strawberry, fireweed, American chestnut, and mulberry.

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Karl Cottenie

In the next 5 years, I will shift my research strategy by consolidating 4 streams of my past research: temporal dynamics, host-symbiont interactions, small mammal metacommunity dynamics, and DNA-based species identification and bioinformatics. I will focus on a study system that combines my past strengths in metacommunity ecology at multiple scales, but will apply them to a novel system: microbial metacommunities nested within a matrix of metacommunity of different host species.

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Elizabeth Boulding

In eastern Canada, the lumpfish and a North American wrasse, the cunner, significantly reduce adult lice densities on salmon living in marine sea cages. My group's work has the following objectives: 1) determine the best size-class of cunners to use in commercial sea cages; 2) examine variation in lice-cleaning performance among cunners and among lumpfish from different stocks; 3) assess heritable variation in lice eating behaviour; 4) Conduct lice challenges of pedigreed salmon with and without the lice cleaner fish present.
3) Increased sea surface temperatures have allowed larval shore crab to invade western Canadian shores and prey on indigenous snail species. We are identifying genomic changes correlated with adaptation to predators in a 25 year field experiment near Bamfield, BC.

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